Hatch.Michele De Lucchi

18 ottobre 2015

Hatch patterns are used in CAD programs to differentiate between areas or to create shades and shadows. One of the things that distinguishes a skilled draftsperson is his or her ability to use hatching effectively.
In the old days, hatching was done by hand, line by line by line. Good hatching required great patience and accuracy (and to tell the truth, I became very good at it). Over the years, a tool appeared for making parallel lines, the “tratteggigrafo”, a type of section liner that was first introduced to me by the master architect Adolfo Natalini. The arm and ruler advanced by increments when you pushed a button on the device with your left hand, permitting your right hand to rapidly make a series of evenly spaced diagonal lines. We were impressed by the speed and “machine” precision of the tool. However, many people refused to use it, claiming that the resulting patterns lacked the personality and human touch of hatching made in the old-fashioned way.
Hatching is used to draw walls, shadows and contours, and to distinguish between various materials and finishes without actually simulating their appearance. Hatching never represents the reality of materials, it only helps distinguish between them, making it clear that a certain piece is one thing, and another piece is another thing

Hatch by UniFor is a wall that does everything a wall should do. It separates and divides, and like good hatching, it is transparent, so that you can see what it is behind it, just as you can see the paper behind hatching.
In the wall version, Hatch is the door that supports the wall. A wall makes sense if you can go to the other side of it. In the office version, Hatch acts as a desk and a sofa. In the old days, desks had chairs in front of them for visitors, and the owner of the desk might sit behind the desk and make pronouncements. Today it is more polite and convivial to sit on a sofa and converse. With Hatch, there is a sofa in front of the desk.

Michele De Lucchi